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What are the alternatives to hybrid and remote learning? These moms share their experiences with homeschooling and unschooling.

mom homeschooling daughter

What are the alternatives to hybrid and remote learning? These moms share their experiences with homeschooling and unschooling with us.

Black families saw the biggest increase in homeschooling this school year of all races. “The proportion homeschooling increased by five times” from spring 2019-2020 school year to the fall of this school year, according to the Census Bureau.

If you’re considering homeschooling for the first time next school year, this panel of homeschooling and unschooling mamas is here to help. 

During our Mama AMA series on pandemic schooling, experts discussed choosing alternative learning options over virtual schooling. 

Moderator Tyshia Ingram and panelists Darcel White of The Mahogany Way, Eva Wilson of Socamom, and Nwamaka Unaka of Nannylands talked at length about the options outside of virtual schooling. 

They covered:

  • The difference between homeschooling and unschooling,
  • How learning pods can work in a pandemic
  • How to manage homeschooling with or without external support
  • The realistic time demands required to prepare for schooling
  • The cost of homeschooling and learning pods

Check out the video here: 

Resources

Testingmom.com: Helps you find out what tests are required for your area

Khan Academy

K12: Online Public School: A resource for mostly online classes, some states are free and may include perks that benefit at home learning

Nannyland’s Pinterest: For easy kid activity ideas

Outschool: Live online classes and clubs

Regular Ass Homeschoolers: Eva Wilson’s Facebook homeschool group (Eva’s group is one of many Facebook groups for Black homeschoolers.)

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Brenda Fadeyibi is an occupational therapist, writer, aspiring novelist, foodie, and mama of one. She can be found in Brooklyn, New York with her 4-year-old son who is learning Kreyol and Yoruba, a nod to both families’ cultures and a way to foster an environment where he can grow up being free in a Black body.

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